IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Form, function and phylogeny of bivalve mucins
Prezant, R.S. (1990). Form, function and phylogeny of bivalve mucins, in: Morton, B. (Ed.) The Bivalvia: Proceedings of a Memorial Symposium in honour of Sir Charles Maurice Yonge (1899-1986) at the 9th International Malacological Congress, 1986, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. pp. 83-95
In: Morton, B. (Ed.) (1990). The Bivalvia: Proceedings of a Memorial Symposium in honour of Sir Charles Maurice Yonge (1899-1986) at the 9th International Malacological Congress, 1986, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. Hong Kong University Press: Hong Kong. ISBN 962-209-273-X. 355 pp., more

Available in Author 
    VLIZ: Proceedings [7743]

Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Prezant, R.S.

Abstract
    Many of the basic behavioural patterns found in bivalve molluscs are based on their abilities to produce mucins. These mucins play pivotal roles in activities as diverse as feeding, protection, shell formation, and dispersal. Mucins were almost certainly involved in incipient formation of calcified shells and likely were intimate components of presumed early cuticular coats of 'protomolluscs'. Similarly, initial pedal attachment structures were no more than adhesive mucins that were the evolutionary anlages of byssi. Many of the structural features of bivalves described by C.M. Yonge in fact were, to some extent or another, producers of, or dependent upon mucins. In particular the mantle and mantle edge are important mucin-producing features that show distinct phylogenetic and ontogenetic trends useful in deciphering bivalve evolution. The initial lateral compression and infaunal mobility of early bivalves led to success of the class in large part because mucins 'allowed' suspension feeding, early protection in the form of an external coat, and lubrication for mucociliary activities such as locomotion. Since the Precambrian, mucins have retained simple and taken on complex functions in the Bivalvia and well reflect their physiological, morphological, behavioural and ecological diversity.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Author