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Atlantic Ocean fisheries
Borgstrom, G.; Heighway, A.J. (Ed.) (1961). Atlantic Ocean fisheries. Fishing News (Books): London. VIII, 336 pp.

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Fisheries General FIG.4 [8776]

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Borgstrom, G., editor
  • Heighway, A.J., editor

Content
  • Carruthers, J.N. (1961). The Atlantic Ocean: north and south, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 1-17, more
  • Laevastu, T. (1961). Natural bases of fisheries in the Atlantic Ocean: their past and present characteristics and possibilities for future expansion, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 18-39, more
  • Engholm, B. (1961). Fishery conservation in the Atlantic Ocean, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 40-48, more
  • Winder, G. (1961). International territorial limits in relation to fishing, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 49-54, more
  • Hardy, A.C. (1961). Types of fishing ships working the Atlantic Ocean, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 55-63, more
  • Burgess, J. (1961). Post-war trends towards improved fishing gear and equipment, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 64-68, more
  • Angerman, H.; Lund, O.; Ramsussen, B. (1961). Norway's fishing industry, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 69-85, more
  • (1961). The fishing industry of Sweden, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 86-87, more
  • Fruczek, Z.; Kordyl, E.; Laszczynski, S. (1961). Development and present state of Polish fisheries, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 88-96, more
  • Hass, G. (1961). The fishing industry of the Federal Republic of Germany, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 97-105, more
  • Nørgaard, J. (1961). Denmark's fishing industry: also Greenland and Faröe, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 106-118, more
  • (1961). The fisheries of the Netherlands, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 119-121, more
  • Cutting, C.L. (1961). The fishing industry of Great Britain: handling and marketing, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 122-137, more
  • Lefevere, S. (1961). Fish processing in Belgium, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 138-143, more
  • Remy, D. (1961). The fish industry of France, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 144-151, more
  • Capont, F.L. (1961). The fish industry of Spain, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 152-164, more
  • Houk, R.J. (1961). The Portuguese fishing industry, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 165-172, more
  • Piegai, A. (1961). The development of the fisheries industry in Italy, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 173-178, more
  • (1961). Fishing enterprise of Africa's N.W. coast: Angola and Morocco, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 179-181, more
  • Dreosti, C.M. (1961). The development of the South African fish industry, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 182-191, more
  • Hart, T.J. (1961). Fishery prospects on the Patagonian continental shelf, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 192-195, more
  • (1961). The sea fishing industry of the Argentine, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 196-204, more
  • Beatty, S.A. (1961). Brazilian fishing, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 205-212, more
  • Hess, E. (1961). The fisheries of the Caribbean sea, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 213-222, more
  • (1961). Mexico's fishing industry needs enterprise, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 223-224, more
  • Borgstrom, G. (1961). U.S. Atlantic fisheries and current trends in supply and use, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 225-255, more
  • Konloch, J. (1961). The fisheries of Canada, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 256-259, more
  • Bjornsson, O. (1961). The Icelandic fisheries, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 260-266, more
  • Ovchynnyk, M.M. (1961). Development of some marine and inland Russian fisheries, and fish utilization, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 267-281, more
  • Borgstrom, G. (1961). The Atlantic fisheries of the USSR, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 282-315, more
  • (1961). Common oceanic and fresh-water food fishes, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 316-329, more
  • (1961). Report of a Committee of Inquiry into the fishing industry of Great Britain, in: Borgstrom, G. et al. (Ed.) Atlantic Ocean fisheries. pp. 330-332, more

Abstract
    This book has one vital purpose. It is to provide in one cover essential facts about tbe Atlantic Ocean (North and South) that are of value to practical fishermen, the executives of companies interested in the catching, processing and marketing of fish, and the statesmen, scientists and administrators of the Fishery Departments of the various countries concerned with drawing food supplies for their populations from its waters. Fundamentally, all must have the same objective; to secure by their activities the maximum sustainable yield without depleting original stocks. Tbe volume is divided into four main sections. In the first are given the fundamental factors of the Atlantic: its physical character, its deeps and currents, with an outline of those processes of admixture which maintain nutrient values; its biology governing the fish life sustained by those waters and their availability and value for commercial purposes; the necessary co-operation evolving between the nations concerned with these sources of food supply; the legal position in the international sense, of claims for extended territorial waters and fishing limits; and the practical development of new techniques and tactics for the catching of fish. All of those articles are written by recognised authorities and they present collectively a composite picture of the highest value. Dr. Carruthers' fascinating article on oceanography is supplemented by a biological essay from the pen of Taivo Laevastu which is of supreme importance for making assessments for the future yields of the Atlantic. Mr. Engholm's survey of the course of events to achieve maximum international co-operation in the commercial use of those waters, is of historic importance and value; as indeed are the remaining articles.The second section of the book outlines the industrial developments by the major nations in fishing the Atlantic. This is of particular value because from each nation's experience and practice something can be learnt by others. Starting from Norway, the logical sequence has been folIowed of progressing down the Western coast of Europe to the southern point of Africa then crossing to Patagonia and working up the Eastern coasts of the two Americas to Canada and across to Iceland. Russia's giant effort is featured in the third section. In these individual articles the main purpose after outlining essential facts, has been to indicate trends and background in relation to current use and future needs. Although statistics play a large part in these surveys, the main value of the articles is in presenting a picture of present development and future trends with a view to encouraging co-operation internationally for the common good. In homely simile, the pool is a big one but if all are to fare weIl and equitably, rules of practice must be developed and observed to preserve continuity of supply. All of these articles are authoritative and ably written. The third section of the book, that dealing with Russia's giant effort, gives to the world for the first time the fullest and most authoritative picture yet published of the Soviet's considerable effort in both inland and marine fishing. She has devoted to the problem intelligent sustained planning, pressed thereto by the urgent need of her growing population for supplies of protein. Some of these practices and developments may seem alarming to others. They certainly indicate not only the likelihood but the certainty of more and more competition arising in the future for the resources of the sea. This, in turn, must have a bearing on the necessity of international co-operation and regulation being developed for the proper management of world fisheries. The fourth section of the book contains a valuable list of the names of some 500 commercial fish in Latin and English, also a glossary of terms and a short summary of the recommendations of Britain's recent Committee of Inquiry into her fishing industry .This is included because of important implications arising from it.Principal Editor of the book is Professor Georg Borgstrom. He has himself contributed two of the major articles-those on the fisheries of the United States and, outstandingly, that on the marine activities of the Soviet Union. By his visits to Russia and other countries and his knowledge of languages Professor Borgstrom has been able to render an outstanding service to the fishing industries of the world. In addition to those two major articles he has played a principal part in organising (and translating in many cases) the supporting articles from other countries. A companion volume on the Pacific Ocean is in preparation.

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