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Defining the ocean environment for the safe design and operation of ships
Faulkner, D. (1998). Defining the ocean environment for the safe design and operation of ships, in: Marine meteorology and related oceanographic activities: provision and engineering/operational application of ocean wave data Unesco, Paris, 21-25 September 1998. pp. 149-161
In: (1998). Marine meteorology and related oceanographic activities: provision and engineering/operational application of ocean wave data Unesco, Paris, 21-25 September 1998. World Meteorological Organization: Geneva. 347 pp., more

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    Marine

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  • Faulkner, D.

Abstract
    The Historical Introduction emphasises the heuristic nature of technical developments in ship structural design and the fact that extreme lifetime design is still mainly based on linear waves no more than about 10m high. Buckley's lone voice over the past 15 years has advocated a Survival Design approach with much larger highly non-linear waves defined by a survivability envelope. Section 2 reviews such conditions and illustrates recent survival assessments that can lead to ship loss through the ship (a) breaking her back, or, (b) flooding and foundering, or (c) capsizing. The problem of predicting extreme sea impact pressures on bridge fronts, etc., is also outlined. The final section 3 outlines the non-steady state oceanographic characteristics required to support the Survival Design approach for ships which is now emerging under a new safety culture climate.

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