IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

The complete mitochondrial genome sequence and characterization of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the control region of the Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer)
Lin, G.; Lo, L.C.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Feng, F.; Chou, R.; Yue, G.H. (2006). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence and characterization of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the control region of the Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer). Mar. Biotechnol. 8(1): 71-79. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10126-005-5051-z
In: Marine Biotechnology. Springer-Verlag: New York. ISSN 1436-2228, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Biopolymorphism; DNA; Phylogeny; Lates calcarifer (Bloch, 1790) [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Barramundi; mtDNA; shotgun sequencing; single-nucleotide polymorphismsand phylogeny

Authors  Top 
  • Lin, G.
  • Lo, L.C.
  • Zhu, Z.Y.
  • Feng, F.
  • Chou, R.
  • Yue, G.H.

Abstract
    We determined the complete mtDNA nucleotide sequence of Lates calcarifer using the shotgun sequencing method. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was 16,535 base pairs (bp) in length, and contained 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and one major noncoding control region (CR). The CR was unusually short at only 768 bp. A striking feature of the mitochondrial genome was the high G+C content (46.1%), which is among the highest in fish. The gene order was identical to that of a typical vertebrate. Phylogenetic analyses using concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes of 30 fish species representing 14 suborders clearly showed Lates calcarifer was located in the cluster of fish species from the order Perciformes, supporting the traditional systematic classification. We characterized single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CR by sequencing the complete CR of 25 individuals obtained from Australia and Singapore. A total of 68 SNPs were detected. Eighteen SNPs were fixed with alternative nucleotides in Australian and Singapore seabass, and these SNPs could be used for differentiating fish from the two countries.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors