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Environmental factors regulating the radial oxygen loss from roots of Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton crispus
Laskov, C.; Horn, O.; Hupfer, M. (2006). Environmental factors regulating the radial oxygen loss from roots of Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton crispus. Aquat. Bot. 84(4): 333-340. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquabot.2005.12.005
In: Aquatic Botany. Elsevier Science: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; London; Amsterdam. ISSN 0304-3770, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Dissolved oxygen; Photosynthesis; Sensors; Water column; Myriophyllum spicatum L. [WoRMS]; Potamogeton crispus L. [WoRMS]; Brackish water; Fresh water

Authors  Top 
  • Laskov, C.
  • Horn, O.
  • Hupfer, M.

Abstract
    Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton crispus are common species of shallow eutrophic lakes in north-eastern Germany, where a slow recovery of the submersed aquatic vegetation was observed. Thus, the characterisation of the root oxygen release (ROL) as well as its implication for geochemical processes in the sediment are of particular interest. A combination of microelectrode measurements, methylene blue agar and a titanium(III) redox buffer was used to investigate the influence of the oxygen content in the water column on ROL, diel ROL dynamics as well as the impact of sediment milieu. Oxygen gradients around the roots revealed a maximum oxygen diffusion zone of up to 250 μm. During a sequence with a light/dark cycle as well as alternating aeration of the water column, maximum ROL with up to 35% oxygen saturation at the root surface occurred under light/O2-saturated conditions. A decrease to about 30% was observed under dark/O2-saturated conditions, no ROL was detected at dark/O2-depleted conditions and only a weak ROL with 5–10% oxygen saturation at the root surface was measured under light but O2-depleted water column. These results indicate, that during darkness, ROL is supplied by oxygen from the water column and even during illumination and active photosynthesis production, ROL is modified by the oxygen content in the water column. Visualisation of ROL patterns revealed an enhanced ROL for plants which were grown in sulfidic littoral sediment in comparison to plants grown in pure quartz sand. For both plant species grown in sulfidic littoral sediment, a ROL rate of 3–4 μmol O2 h−1 plant−1 was determined with the Ti(III) redox buffer. For plants grown in pure quartz sand, the ROL rate decreased to 1–2 μmol O2 h−1 plant−1. Hence, aside from the oxygen content in the water column, the redox conditions and microbial oxygen demand in the sediment has to be considered as a further major determinant of ROL.

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