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Panmixia in the European eel: a matter of time ...
Dannewitz, J.; Maes, G.E.; Johansson, L.; Wickström, H.; Volckaert, F.A.M.J.; Järvi, T. (2005). Panmixia in the European eel: a matter of time ... Proc. - Royal Soc., Biol. Sci. 272: 1129-1137. dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2005.3064
In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. The Royal Society: London. ISSN 0962-8452, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Dannewitz, J.; Maes, G.E.; Johansson, L.; Wickström, H.; Volckaert, F.A.M.J.; Järvi, T. (2005). Panmixia in the European eel: a matter of time ..., in: Maes, G.E. Evolutionary consequences of a catadromous life-strategy on the genetic structure of European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.). pp. 101-115, more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 98776 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Conservation; Microsatellites; Microsatellites; Temporal variations; Anguilla anguilla (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Dannewitz, J.
  • Maes, G.E., more
  • Johansson, L.
  • Wickström, H.
  • Volckaert, F.A.M.J., more
  • Järvi, T.

Abstract
    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) has been a prime example of the panmixia paradigm because of its extraordinary adaptation to the North Atlantic gyral system, semelparous spawning in the Sargasso Sea and long trans-oceanic migration. Recently, this view was challenged by the suggestion of a genetic structure characterised by an isolation-by-distance (IBD) pattern. This is only likely if spawning subpopulations are spatially and/or temporally separated, followed by non-random larval dispersal. A limitation of previous genetic work oneels is the lack of replication over time to test for temporal stability of genetic structure. Here we hypothesize that temporal genetic variation plays a significant role in explaining the spatial structure reported earlier for this species. We tested this by increasing the texture of geographical sampling and by including temporal replicates. Overall genetic differentiation among samples was low, highly significant and comparable to earlier studies (FST = 0.0014; p < 0.01). On the other hand and in sharp contrast with current understandings, hierarchical analyses revealed no significant inter-location genetic heterogeneity and hence no IBD. Instead, genetic variation among temporal samples within sites clearly exceeded the geographical component. Our results provide support for the panmixia hypothesis and emphasize the importance of temporal replication when assessing population structure of marine fish species.

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