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The importance of man in the study of waves and currents from manned satellite
Freeman, J.C. Jr. (1965). The importance of man in the study of waves and currents from manned satellite, in: Ewing, G.C. (Ed.) Oceanography from Space: Proceedings of Conference on the Feasibility of Conducting Oceanographic Explorations from Aircraft, Manned Orbital and Lunar Laboratories, held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 24-28 August 1964. pp. 111
In: Ewing, G.C. (Ed.) (1965). Oceanography from Space: Proceedings of Conference on the Feasibility of Conducting Oceanographic Explorations from Aircraft, Manned Orbital and Lunar Laboratories, held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 24-28 August 1964. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Woods Hole. XXI, 469 pp., more

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    Marine

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  • Freeman, J.C. Jr.

Abstract
    The obvious function of a man in a measuring system is that of a weak power source which shows discretion. (e.g. He can select and pull a significant switch) . The importance of the man is emphasized by my experience in preparing for this conference: When I asked myself how to measure waves from an unmanned satellite the answers all included devices in the ocean. When the question of measuring waves from a manned satellite is considered the possibility of photographing surf and infrared photography of waves radiating from a storm present themselves immediately. The reason that we can consider a man as making this possible is that he is a good "shoreline seeker" and a good "storm seeker." A good telescopic camera guided by a man can take good enough photographs to study wave lengths and possibly some indication of wave heights. When satellites and aircraft are compared as vehicles for study of the ocean, the satellite becomes less expensive for gathering routine world-wide data over areas measured on a planetary scale.

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