Catalogue | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

Catalogue

This search interface gives access to the reference database of VLIZ, an extensive collection of (inter)national marine scientific literature references.

You can limit your search to the Belgian marine literature only or to the VLIZ Library catalogue only by checking the 'VLIZ Library' box.

New search
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Print this page

Climate change and expanding invasive species drive widespread declines of native trout in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA
Bell, D.A.; Kovach, R.P.; Muhlfeld, C.C.; Al-Chokhachy, R.; Cline, T.J.; Whited, D.C.; Schmetterling, D.A.; Lukacs, P.M.; Whiteley, A.R. (2021). Climate change and expanding invasive species drive widespread declines of native trout in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. Science Advances 7(52): eabj5471. https://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abj5471
In: Science Advances. AAAS: New York. ISSN 2375-2548, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Authors  Top 
  • Bell, D.A.
  • Kovach, R.P.
  • Muhlfeld, C.C.
  • Al-Chokhachy, R.
  • Cline, T.J.
  • Whited, D.C.
  • Schmetterling, D.A.
  • Lukacs, P.M.
  • Whiteley, A.R.

Abstract
    Climate change and invasive species are major threats to native biodiversity, but few empirical studies have examined their combined effects at large spatial and temporal scales. Using 21,917 surveys collected over 30 years, we quantified the impacts of climate change on the past and future distributions of five interacting native andinvasive trout species throughout the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. We found that the occupancy of native bull trout and cutthroat trout declined by 18 and 6%, respectively (1993–2018), and was predicted to decrease by an additional 39 and 16% by 2080. However, reasons for these occupancy reductions markedly differed among species: Climate-driven increases in water temperature and decreases in summer flow likely caused declines of bull trout, while climate-induced expansion of invasive species largely drove declines of cutthroat trout. Our results demonstrate that climate change can affect ecologically similar, co-occurring native species throughdistinct pathways, necessitating species-specific management actions.

All data in the Integrated Marine Information System (IMIS) is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors