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Local ecological knowledge versus published literature: a review of non-indigenous Mollusca in Greek marine waters
Crocetta, F.; Gofas, S.; Salas, C.; Tringali, L.P.; Zenetos, A. (2017). Local ecological knowledge versus published literature: a review of non-indigenous Mollusca in Greek marine waters. Aquat. Invasions 12(4): 415-434. https://hdl.handle.net/10.3391/ai.2017.12.4.01
In: Aquatic Invasions. Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre (REABIC): Helsinki. ISSN 1798-6540; e-ISSN 1818-5487, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Alien species
    Geography > Biogeography
    MED, Mediterranean [Marine Regions]
    Marine
Author keywords
    biological invasion; citizen science

Authors  Top 
  • Crocetta, F., more
  • Gofas, S., more
  • Salas, C.
  • Tringali, L.P.
  • Zenetos, A., more

Abstract
    A review of the scientific literature and an analysis of unpublished material identified ~ 50 possible alien molluscs from Greece,four of which were newly reported here. Records of ~ 100 additional taxa, which would strongly inflate the alien species numbers,were excluded. Among the ~ 50 candidate species, 43 were confirmed as alien and 12 as cryptogenic. Twenty-nine alien specieswere considered established, and four deemed invasive. Our results are consistent with the position of Greece in the east-westMediterranean gradient, as well as the Aegean marine environment. The contribution of well-informed citizen scientists appears tobe crucial to our overall knowledge of alien molluscan biotas because only 12 alien taxa were detected during formal researchprojects, while 31 were first found by amateurs. No molluscan introductions were confirmed from Greece pre-1960s, and subsequentperiods had variable numbers of introductions, ranging from 0 (1976–1980) to 9.5 (2006–2010). The areas with the highest alienspecies concentrations were the Saronikos Gulf, near the Piraeus port area, and the Dodekanisa, near the Levantine coastline.Despite a general decline in taxonomic expertise and in local knowledge, we show that these are still needed when compiling andanalyzing alien species inventories that subsequently influence policy and management decisions.

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