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Phytoplankton patchiness: Ecological implications and observation methods
Abbott, M.R. (1993). Phytoplankton patchiness: Ecological implications and observation methods, in: Levin, S.A. et al. (Ed.) Patch dynamics. Lecture Notes in Biomathematics, 96: pp. 37-49. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-3-642-50155-5_4
In: Levin, S.A. et al. (Ed.) (1993). Patch dynamics. Lecture Notes in Biomathematics, 96. Springer-Verlag: Berlin; Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-56525-3. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-3-642-50155-5, more
In: Lecture Notes in Biomathematics. Springer-Verlag: Berlin; Heidelberg. ISSN 0341-633X, more

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Author keywords
    Cash Flow; Internal Wave Southern Ocean; Particulate Organic Carbon; Phytoplankton Growth

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  • Abbott, M.R.

Abstract
    Phytoplankton ecosystems were once viewed as nearly static (or at least only slowly varying) systems on scales of roughly a few days and spatial scales of a few tens of kilometers. A notable example of research based on this view is the map of primary production by Koblentz-Mishke et al. (1970). As sampling techniques improved, variability was found to occur at smaller and smaller scales. Much of this variability was thought to be controlled by physical processes, such as turbulence, and these processes were included in models of the variance spectrum (Denman et al. 1977, Denman and Platt 1976). These ideas challenged the traditional notions of stability, suggesting that maps of “average” biomass and productivity were essentially meaningless; the structure of the variability of the planktonic ecosystem was thought to be more important.

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