Water tanks for marine organisms | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

Water tanks for marine organisms

The Flanders Marine Institute puts three water tanks at the disposal that are mainly used for research of fish. The water tanks could, for instance, be used as a quarantine to execute fish experiments.

How does a water tank work?

The cold store of the Marine Station Ostend (MSO) containing the two water tanks can be cooled/warmed at a temperature between 5° and 30°C. Each tank is completely separated from the other and has its own filtration system; a biological filter tank and mechanical filters. Each tank contains 4000 l water and can be cooled at a temperature between 5° and 20 °C.

Both the oxygen and the temperature can be adjusted in the water tank. The day- and night light are simulated as good as possible. In the future, a light dimmer will be installed.  

An ozon generator causes the death of the most important viruses and bacteria. A protein skimmer and drum filter are installed to remove respectively the unnecessary floam and flakes. Besides the temperature sensor, the water tanks also contain a redox sensor.

  Photos

Usefulness of a water tank?

  • Experiments can be conducted

Technical details

  • Cold store:
    • Dimensions: 8 x 5,5 m (100 m2)
    • Cooling: Between 5° and 30°C
    • Day- and nightlight
  • Water tank:
    • Diameter: 2,5 m
    • Depth: 1,2 m
    • Own filtration system (biological + mechanical)
    • Cooling: between 5° and 20° C
    • Ozongenerator
    • Protein skimmer
    • Drum filter
    • Temperatuur sensor
    • Redox sensor
  • Buffer tanks:
    • Volume: 10 m3

You want to use a water tank?

For more information about our rental service, please contact VLIZ.

Use and conditions

Note: if you use the water tanks of VLIZ as a scientist, please refer to it in your publications as: 'This work was supported by data & infrastructure provided by the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ)'.

Funding

VLIZ & EMBRC (European Marine Biological Resource Centre)