NARMS source details

Baird, William. (1865). Contributions towards a monograph of the species of Annelides belonging to the Aphroditacea, containing a list of the known species, and a description of some new species contained in the National Collection of the British Museum. The Journal of the Linnean Society of London. Zoology. 8(31-32): 172-202.
49053
10.1111/j.1096-3642.1865.tb02438.x [view]
Baird, William
1865
Contributions towards a monograph of the species of <i>Annelides</i> belonging to the <i>Aphroditacea</i>, containing a list of the known species, and a description of some new species contained in the National Collection of the British Museum.
The Journal of the Linnean Society of London. Zoology
8(31-32): 172-202
Publication
World Polychaeta Database (WPolyDb)
[Introduction as follows:]
"Animalium molluscorum in mari degentium vix centesimam partem bene novimus. Tanta autem est Naturae in eorum forma et fabrica varietas, et tanta non modo inter genus et genus, sed inter generum extremas quoque species plerumque discrepantia, ut vel exercitatissimi in his saepe dubii haereant quonam hoc vel illud noviter repertum ex hac classe animal referant, quove nomine adpellent." Pallas. Miscell. Zool. p. 72.
Amongst the Aphroditacea are several Annelides which are remarkable for their size and beauty. The genus Aphrodita, from which the family derives its name, was created by Linnaeus to contain the brilliantly shining and splendidly iridescent-haired worm, commonly known by the name of the Sea-Mouse, and several other allied species which now form the types of distinct genera. Of these MM. Audouin and Milne-Edwards enumerate 6, and Grrube 7; but later authors have so increased the number of species belonging to these, that Kinberg, a Swedish naturalist, and one of the most receut writers on the subject of the Annelides, has found it convenient to form almost each of the older genera into distinct families. In this paper I propose adopting his arrangement, as well as his terminology.
MM. Audouin and Milne-Edwards, and most succeeding authors, describe the animals belonging to the Aphroditacea as possessing five antennae one, single, in the centre, which they call the median antenna, or antenne impaire, two others (one on each side) which they denominate the intermediate, and two others, which they call the external. In addition to these organs connected with the head, are a pair of antenna-like organs which terminate the first pair of feet, instead of a fascicle of bristles, and which they describe by the name of the ventral cirri of the first pair of feet. Kinberg looks upon the single antenna in the centre as being a tentacle or feeler; the intermediate antennae he considers the true antennae; and the external ones he calls palpi; whilst the ventral cirri of the first pair of feet are denominated the buccal cirri.
Systematics, Taxonomy
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2013-01-12 18:30:12Z
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