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Vegetative and reproductive phenology of Chondrophycus perforatus and Laurencia viridis (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) in Tenerife, Canary Islands
Gil-Rodríguez, M.C.; Haroun, R. (2002). Vegetative and reproductive phenology of Chondrophycus perforatus and Laurencia viridis (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) in Tenerife, Canary Islands. Constancea 83: [no pag.]
In: Constancea: University of California Electronic Publications in Botany. University of California: Berkeley, more

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Gil-Rodríguez, M.C.
  • Haroun, R.

Abstract
    Vegetative and reproductive phenology of two intertidal red macroalgae: Chondrophycus perforatus (Bory) Nam and Laurencia viridis Gil-Rodríguez & Haroun (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) were compared between sites on the northern and southern shore of Tenerife Island (Canary Islands). Several biometrical parameters were obtained over a period of 24 months. Physical and chemical characteristics of the two sites were determined. Chondrophycus perforatus, a perennial, reaches maximum size in early summer (June to July) in the north, winter (December to March) in the south. Tetrasporophytes are most abundant in the north during summer, while they are most abundant in the south in autumn and winter. Female gametophytes were not found; male gametophytes were rare. Laurencia viridis, an annual, appears in the north in autumn (September to December), reaches maximum size in spring and early summer (June), and disappears in July, while in the south, it carries out its life history one to two months earlier. Tetrasporophytes dominate in the spring to early summer at both sites. Male plants appear early at the southern site and continue growing throughout the winter at both sites. Cystocarpic plants are present during the period December to June in the north, November to May in the south. The differential growth of both species in the two locations are discussed in relation to key environmental parameters, such as temperature and light regime. The higher sea surface temperature and irradiance encountered in the southern site may explain the early development of the populations of both species.

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