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Variability in abundance and fluxes of dimethyl sulphide in the Indian Ocean
Shenoy, D.M.; Kumar, M.D. (2007). Variability in abundance and fluxes of dimethyl sulphide in the Indian Ocean, in: Van Leeuwe, M.A. et al. (Ed.) Phaeocystis, major link in the biogeochemical cycling of climate-relevant elements. Biogeochemistry, 83(1-3): pp. 277-292
In: Van Leeuwe, M.A. et al. (Ed.) (2007). Phaeocystis, major link in the biogeochemical cycling of climate-relevant elements. Biogeochemistry, 83(1-3). Springer: Dordrecht. ISBN 978-1-4020-6213-1. 330 pp., more
In: Biogeochemistry. Springer: Dordrecht; Lancaster; Boston. ISSN 0168-2563, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Aquatic communities PBC [132119]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Monsoons; Particulate flux; ISW, Indian Ocean [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Shenoy, D.M.
  • Kumar, M.D.

Abstract
    Dimethyl sulphide (DMS) is a biogenic gas of climatic significance on which limited information is available from the Indian Ocean. To fill this gap, we collected data on DMS and total dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSPt) by participating in a dozen cruises. Here, we discuss the variability in DMS and DMSPt in the north and central Indian Ocean in terms of their spatial and temporal variation. DMS and DMSPt exhibited significant spatial and temporal variability. Apart from the concentration gradients in DMS within the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and Central Indian Ocean basins, differences in average abundances were conspicuous between these basins. The Arabian Sea contained more DMS (mixed layer average was 7.8 nM) followed by the Bay of Bengal (2.8 nM) and the Central Indian Ocean (2.7 nM). The highest concentrations of DMS and DMSPt (525 nM and 916 nM, respectively) were found in upwelling regimes along the west coast of India during the Southwest monsoon and fall intermonsoon seasons. Average surface DMS was the highest in the Arabian Sea. On the other hand observed sea-to-air fluxes of DMS were higher in the Bay of Bengal due to the prevalence of turbulent conditions. In the Arabian Sea wind speeds were low and hence the sea-to-air fluxes. The total diffusive flux of DMS from the study area to atmosphere is estimated to be about 1.02 × 1012 g S y-1, which contributes to 4.1-6.3% of the global DMS emission.

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