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The need for studies of oceanic cloud climatology
Widger, W.K. Jr. (1965). The need for studies of oceanic cloud climatology, in: Ewing, G.C. (Ed.) Oceanography from Space: Proceedings of Conference on the Feasibility of Conducting Oceanographic Explorations from Aircraft, Manned Orbital and Lunar Laboratories, held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 24-28 August 1964. pp. 295
In: Ewing, G.C. (Ed.) (1965). Oceanography from Space: Proceedings of Conference on the Feasibility of Conducting Oceanographic Explorations from Aircraft, Manned Orbital and Lunar Laboratories, held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 24-28 August 1964. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Woods Hole. XXI, 469 pp., more

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    Marine

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  • Widger, W.K. Jr.

Abstract
    For many of the wavelengths and sensors proposed for oceanic observations from a satellite, the presence of clouds will seriously degrade and often completely prevent the desired observations. A survey of the nephana1yses published in the Catalogs of Tiros Television Cloud Photography for Tiros IV -VII has made it very obvious that sizeable areas normally completely free of cloud are comparatively rare over the oceans except for special, small areas such as that south-east of Arabia. Accordingly. observations requiring the absence of clouds must be made through the small individual clear patches within areas of scattered or broken clouds if they are to be made with any reasonable frequency. For determining the design and feasibility of such observations, a much improved knowledge of the cloud climatology of ocean areas is needed. Since the most pertinent factors are the frequency, for various geographic locations, of clear patches of various sizes within areas of scattered-to-broken clouds, these studies cannot be made solely from existing surface observations. The Tiros cloud picture data, in spite of a shorter length of record than is to be climatologically desired, could be appropriately analyzed to contribute significantly to this problem area, and so to the optimum design of satellite sensors for oceanographic purposes.

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