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Dietary amino acid L-threonine requirement of fingerling Indian catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) estimated by growth and biochemical parameters
Ahmed, I. (2007). Dietary amino acid L-threonine requirement of fingerling Indian catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) estimated by growth and biochemical parameters. Aquacult. Int. 15(5): 337-350. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10499-007-9097-y
In: Aquaculture International. Springer: London. ISSN 0967-6120, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Amino acids; Body composition; Growth; Threonine; Brackish water; Fresh water

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  • Ahmed, I.

Abstract
    An eight-week feeding experiment was conducted to quantify the dietary threonine requirement of young catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis (9.20 ± 0.85 cm, 3.60 ± 0.45 g) using isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets [40% crude protein (CP); 4.28 kcal g/100 g, gross energy (GE)] containing casein, gelatin and L-crystalline amino acids. Six dietary treatments supplemented with graded levels of L-threonine (0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50 and 1.75 g per 100 g, dry diet), in gradations of 0.25 g per 100 g dry diet were formulated. Fish were randomly stocked, in triplicate groups, in 55-l indoor polyvinyl flow-through circular tanks and fed experimental diets at 4% of their body weight divided over two equal feedings at 08:00 and 16:00 hours. Feeding schedule and ration size were worked out prior to the start of the feeding trial. Live weight gain (263%), feed conversion ratio (FCR) (1.35) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) (1.85) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in fish fed a diet containing 1.25% dietary threonine. However, second-degree polynomial regression analysis of live weight gain, FCR, PER and body protein deposition data indicated the dietary threonine requirement to be 1.37, 1.26, 1.23 and 1.24 g per 100 g of dry diet, respectively. Whole-body moisture decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with the increase of dietary concentration up to 1.25%. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher protein content was evident in fish fed a diet containing 1.25% threonine. Body fat increased significantly (P < 0.05) with the increase of dietary concentration and was found to be highest at a 1.75% threonine concentration. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher ash content was reported at the 0.50 and 0.75% threonine levels. Body protein deposition was also found to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher at the 1.25% threonine level, followed by the 1.50% threonine level. Based on these results, it is recommended that the diet for fingerling H. fossilis should contain threonine at a level of 1.27 g per 100 g of dry diet, corresponding to 3.17 g per 100 g of dietary protein for optimum growth and efficient feed utilization. No mortality was observed during the experiment.

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