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A preliminary survey of the macroscopic bottom fauna of the Solent, with particular reference to Crepidula fornicata and Ostrea edulis
Barnes, R.S.K.; Coughlan, J.; Holmes, N.J. (1973). A preliminary survey of the macroscopic bottom fauna of the Solent, with particular reference to Crepidula fornicata and Ostrea edulis. Proc. Malac. Soc. 40(4): 253-275
In: Proceedings of the Malacological Society of London. Angus Graham Associates: London. ISSN 0025-1194, more

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Keywords
    Benthos; Introduced species; Crepidula fornicata (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Ostrea edulis Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; ANE, British Isles, England, Solent [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Barnes, R.S.K.
  • Coughlan, J.
  • Holmes, N.J.

Abstract
    The macroscopic epibenthos of the Solent consists of a characteristic assemblage of species in which the American slipper limpet, Crepidula fornicate, is dominant. This assemblage is present, with modifications due to substrate and to different geographical positioning, throughout the majority of the region. Small areas also occur in which this association is absent, i.e. in the western half of the mouth of Southampton Water a glutinous mud substratum supports an Abra/Nephthys association, although the typical Crepidula association can occur where human and industrial solid refuse provides a hard substratum, and in the West Solent considerable areas of large-stone beds are faunistically almost barren, presumably due to current action. The West Solent also supports large stocks of Ostrea edulis, although the majority of the population are of the 1970 years class and hence are immature. There was evidence of a double spatfall in Stanswood Bay in 1971, but no settlement has apparently taken place west of the Beaulieu River. Ostrea and its competitor Crepidula occur in greatest numbers in non-overlapping areas. The composition of the Crepidula association and its regional and substratum-induced variation are described in a preliminary manner and it is considered that a characteristic assemblage of species may accompany Crepidula in several areas to which it has been introduced or to which it has spread.

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