Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
report an error in this recordbasket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Process study of coastal circulation over the inner Scotian Shelf using a nested-grid ocean circulation model, with a special emphasis on the storm-induced circulation during tropical storm Alberto in 2006
Yang, B.; Sheng, J. (2008). Process study of coastal circulation over the inner Scotian Shelf using a nested-grid ocean circulation model, with a special emphasis on the storm-induced circulation during tropical storm Alberto in 2006. Ocean Dynamics 58(5-6): 375-396. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10236-008-0149-2
In: Ocean Dynamics. Springer-Verlag: Berlin. ISSN 1616-7341, more
Peer reviewed article

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Aerospace engineering; Coastal circulation; Hydrographic surveying; Image segmentation; Models; Storm surges; Three dimensional models; Tropical storms; ANW, Atlantic, Scotian Shelf [gazetteer]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Yang, B.
  • Sheng, J.

Abstract
    This study examines main physical processes affecting the three-dimensional (3D) circulation and hydrographic distributions over the inner Scotian Shelf (ISS) in June and July 2006 using a nested-grid coastal ocean circulation modeling system known as the NCOPS-LB. The nested-grid system has five relocatable downscaling submodels, with the outermost submodel of a coarse horizontal resolution of (1/12)° for simulating storm surges and barotropic shelf waves over the Eastern Canadian shelf and the innermost submodel of a fine resolution of ~180 m for simulating the 3D coastal circulation and hydrography over Lunenburg Bay of Nova Scotia in the default setup. The NCOPS-LB is driven by meteorological and astronomical forcing and used to study the storm-induced circulation over the ISS during tropical storm Alberto. Model results demonstrate that the coastal circulation and hydrographic distributions over the ISS are affected significantly by tides, local wind forcing, and remotely generated coastal waves during the study period.

 Top | Authors