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Factors controlling benthic metabolism during low tide in an intertidal bay along a granulometric gradient (Roscoff Aber Bay, Western English Channel, France)
Hubas, C.; Davoult, D.; Cariou, T.; Artigas, L.F. (2006). Factors controlling benthic metabolism during low tide in an intertidal bay along a granulometric gradient (Roscoff Aber Bay, Western English Channel, France). Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 316: 53-68. dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps316053
In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. Inter-Research: Oldendorf/Luhe. ISSN 0171-8630, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Bacteria; Benthic communities; In situ measurements; Nutrients; Phytobenthos; Primary production; Respiration; Temperature; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Hubas, C., more
  • Davoult, D., more
  • Cariou, T.
  • Artigas, L.F.

Abstract
    In this study, benthic metabolism was measured during low tide, in a small intertidal bay. Gross primary production (GPP) and benthic community respiration (BCR) were calculated via in situ CO2 flux measurements at the air-sediment interface within a benthic chamber. These rates (GPP and BCR) were determined simultaneously with microphytobenthos (MPB), bacterial (BB), macrofaunal (MaB) and meiofaunal (MeB) biomasses, grain size analysis and nutrient standing stocks in sediment porewater (NO2-, NO3-, NH4+, SiO32- and PO43-). The aims of this study were to determine (1) the relative influence of environmental regulating factors on benthic metabolism under in situ conditions and (2) the relative contribution of benthic compartments to BCR. Among all the potential regulating factors measured (i.e. sediment temperature, dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations in porewater), and the entire size range of benthic organisms sampled (i.e. from macrofauna to bacteria), results showed that (1) granulometry strongly controlled the distribution of benthic compartments at the bay scale and (2) GPP and BCR were mostly influenced by temperature at the sampling site scale. Moreover, out of bacteria, macrofauna and meiofauna, bacterial activity contributed the most to BCR (bacterial > macrofaunal > meiofaunal respiration). Mean bacterial respiration was estimated to be 1.5 ± 0.5 mgC m-2 h-1 and represented up to 88% of BCR in fine-sand sediments.

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