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Oportunidades potenciales para la acuicultura de moluscos bivalvos en el Caribe
Sarkis, S. (2008). Oportunidades potenciales para la acuicultura de moluscos bivalvos en el Caribe, in: Lovatelli, A. et al. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12: pp. 151-157
In: Lovatelli, A.; Farías, A.; Uriarte, I. (Ed.) (2008). Estado actual del cultivo y manejo de moluscos bivalvos y su proyección futura. factores que afectan su sustentabilidad en América Latina. Taller Técnico Regional de la FAO, 20-24 de agosto de 2007, Puerto Montt, chile. FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura, 12. FAO: Rome. ISBN 978-92-5-306115-0. 359 pp., more
In: FAO Actas de Pesca y Acuicultura. FAO: Roma. ISSN 2071-1026, more

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  • Sarkis, S.

Abstract
    Caribbean aquaculture production accounts for less than 1 percent of the world’s aquaculture. Culture efforts are directed mainly towards non-native species, such as tilapia and shrimp. However, based on biological and economical factors, there are opportunities to develop this sector, particularly by focusing on Caribbean native
    species. There is information available in the literature on growth, reproduction and/ or culture of several native species, providing the basis for a culture programme. In addition, the potential for a local market is present given that the demand for fresh seafood often exceeds the supply in many of these tourism-driven islands. Despite the help of a number of international organizations and institutions, there has been little or no continuity in aquaculture projects. This may be due in part to the lack of national or action plan for aquaculture in several of these islands. Furthermore, the limited resources available in this region, coupled with minimal cooperation among the various governments inhibit the development of a long-term programme. For bivalve species, one of the most constraining factors is the limited seed supply. Hence, an alternative approach is proposed involving the development of a Regional Hatchery for the production of native species. The first step required is an initial assessment of the potential interest and commitment of Caribbean governments for such a facility, with the help of an international organization, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization, of the United Nations (FAO), as a facilitator.

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