IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Relationship between the zooplankton, phytoplankton, particulate matter and dissolved free amino acids in the Celtic Sea
Williams, R.; Poulet, S.A. (1986). Relationship between the zooplankton, phytoplankton, particulate matter and dissolved free amino acids in the Celtic Sea. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 90(2): 279-284
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Amino acids; Dissolved organic matter; Diurnal variations; Environmental factors; Phytoplankton; Suspended particulate matter; Vertical distribution; Zooplankton; ANE, Celtic Sea [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Williams, R.
  • Poulet, S.A.

Abstract
    Estimates of the biomass of zooplankton, phytoplankton and particulate matter collected in the Celtic Sea during mixed-water conditions (on 8 and 9 April 1983) were compared to the concentration and diversity of sixteen dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) measured in seawater and in particles. During a day profile, variations of dissolved amino acids with depth reflected the feeding activity of copepods. The relationship was not apparent in a night profile and other processes, such as heterotrophic utilization of dissolved nitrogen by microorganisms, were thought to be involved. The ratios of total DFAA concentration (nM litre-1) in the particulate phase over the concentration in seawater ranged from 1 to 200 within the water column. Of the sixteen amino acids measured, ornithine, a decomposition product of arginine, was responsible for more than 70% of the total concentration of DFAA in seawater. In the particles, phenylalanine ranged from 30 to 88% of total DFAA. In seawater this amino acid occurred in the 20 to 40 m depths (1.3 to 9.9% of total DFAA) in the day profile and at 5 m (12.4%) and 80 m (6.4%) in the night profile. Previously it has only been found in very low concentrations (<5%) in seawater, and its presence is considered to be the result of zooplankton feeding.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors