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Relationship of potential temperature and silicate in the deep waters between Cape Lookout, North Carolina, and Bermuda
Stefánsson, U.; Atkinson, L.P. (1971). Relationship of potential temperature and silicate in the deep waters between Cape Lookout, North Carolina, and Bermuda. J. Mar. Res. 29(3): 306-318
In: Journal of Marine Research. Sears Foundation for Marine Research, Yale University: New Haven, Conn.. ISSN 0022-2402, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Stefánsson, U.
  • Atkinson, L.P.

Abstract
    The relationship between potential temp ( Theta ) and silicate for potential temps below 15°C is more descriptive than conventional temp-salinity relationship. The scatter diagram of Theta and silicate consists of 4 linear segments. This pattern suggests 4 major water masses: (i) North Atlantic Central Water, with silicate concs increasing as potential temps decrease from 15° to 8.2°C, where an intermediate silicate maximum occurs; (ii) Subarctic Water, with a silicate minimum similar to 4°C; (iii) North Atlantic Deep Water, with silicate concs increasing as potential temps decrease from 4° to 2°C; and (iv) Bottom Water ( Theta <2°C). where silicate concs with decreasing temps within the North Atlantic Deep Water is believed to arise mainly from the re-solution of silica from particulate matter. 3 mechanisms that contribute to the rapidly increasing silicate concs with decreasing potential temp of the Bottom Water are discussed: (i) re-solution of silica from bottom sediments, with subsequent upward diffusion; (ii) solution of silica suspension; and (iii) silicate enrichment that results from mixing with Antarctic Bottom Water. It is concluded that Antarctic Bottom Water represents the main source of silicate enrichment in the Bottom Water. It is suggested that silicate observations may provide the best available means for tracing the penetration of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Atlantic.

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