Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

In:

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
report an error in this recordbasket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Importance and abundance of the recently established species Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst in the German Bight
Rick, H.-J.; Dürselen, C.-D. (1995). Importance and abundance of the recently established species Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst in the German Bight. Helgol. Meeresunters. 49(1-4): 355-374
In: Helgoländer Meeresuntersuchungen. Biologische Anstalt Helgoland: Hamburg. ISSN 0174-3597, more
Peer reviewed article

Also published as
  • Rick, H.-J.; Dürselen, C.-D. (1995). Importance and abundance of the recently established species Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst in the German Bight, in: Franke, H.-D. et al. (Ed.) (1995). The challenge to marine biology in a changing world: Proceedings of the International Symposium commemorating the Centenary of the Biologische Anstalt Helgoland, 13-18th September 1992. Helgoländer Meeresuntersuchungen, 49(1-4): pp. 355-374, more

Available in Authors 

Keywords
    Biomass; Carbon cycle; Dominant species; Ecological distribution; Phytoplankton; Coscinodiscus granii Gough, 1905 [WoRMS]; Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst, 1931 [WoRMS]; ANE, Germany, German Bight [gazetteer]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Rick, H.-J.
  • Dürselen, C.-D.

Abstract
    Grids of 17 to 50 stations in the German Bight were sampled 18 times within the framework of the multidisciplinary programmes ZISCH and PRISMA in winter and spring of 1988/89 and from April 1991-April 1992. The frequent abundance of Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst, a recently established large diatom, was noteworthy, as it dominated the phytoplankton biomass over long periods (e.g. 12/88-3/89 and 8/91-11/91). The bulk of the phytoplankton carbon during these periods (up to 90%) could be attributed to this species. Blooms of Coscinodiscus wailesii producing up to 1400 mu g carbon/l were recorded in early spring of 1989 and autumn of 1991. The potential consequences for the whole ecosystem refer to the huge size of this organism, which may cause reduced exploitation of its primary production by native consumers. Furthermore, sedimentation and remineralisation processes may be affected. For C. wailesii, a doubling of biomass in 70 h could be estimated on the basis of data from four successive surveys in 1991. Results from laboratory cultures under comparable conditions confirm this rate. In the survey area, no increase in biomass was recorded for the related Coscinodiscus granii Gough, although there was sufficient sificate supply for growth. Field data showed 8-10 times lower copper and 10-20 times lower cadmium and zinc accumulation in C. wailesii, compared to concentrations found in native phytoplankton species. Subsequent laboratory tests suggested that one reason for the remarkable success of C. wailesii, mainly in inshore regions, may be derived from its tolerance of higher doses of heavy metals due to very low sorption

 Top | Authors