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Evaluating bacterial biomass and activity in marine sediments
Tholosan, O.; Bianchi, A. (1998). Evaluating bacterial biomass and activity in marine sediments, in: Dehairs, F.A. et al. (Ed.) Integrated Marine System Analysis. European Network for Integrated Marine System Analysis FWO Vlaanderen: Proceedings of the second network meeting (Brussels, May 29-31, 1997). pp. 363-376
In: Dehairs, F.A.; Elskens, M.; Goeyens, L. (Ed.) (1998). Integrated Marine System Analysis. European Network for Integrated Marine System Analysis FWO Vlaanderen: Proceedings of the second network meeting (Brussels, May 29-31, 1997). VUB. Laboratorium voor Analytische Chemie: Brussel. 376 pp., more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Proceedings D [23843]
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Activity patterns; Bacteria; Biomass; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Tholosan, O.
  • Bianchi, A.

Abstract
    This review provides a brief presentation of the main objectives and the state of the art in benthic microbiology , referring successively to the microbial ecologist, the oceanographer and the geomicrobiologist point of view. These complementary disciplines imply specific experimental strategies and methodologies to enumerate, characterise and identify the benthic microbial communities as well as some of their metabolic activities able to interfere on the environmental characteristics of the benthic systems.Examples of bacterial distribution and metabolic activities (bacterial biomass production, rate of hydrolysis of polymers and mineralization rate of low molecular weight 14C-labeled compounds) measured at the water-sediment boundary layer are presented, and compared to those measured in the overlaying water column. In the benthic area, bacterial populations result abundant and active mainly in the upper layer submitted to the bioturbation processes. Bacterial densities and their metabolic rates drastically and rapidly decrease below the mixed layer. Nevertheless, it is now obvious that bacteria can survive in some sedimentary deposits through geological periods.

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