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Should we expect a relationship between primary production and fisheries? The role of copepod dynamics as a filter of trophic variability
Runge, J.A. (1988). Should we expect a relationship between primary production and fisheries? The role of copepod dynamics as a filter of trophic variability, in: Boxshall, G.A. et al. (Ed.) Biology of copepods: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Copepoda. Developments in Hydrobiology, 47: pp. 61-71. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-94-009-3103-9_6
In: Boxshall, G.A.; Schminke, H.K. (Ed.) (1988). Biology of copepods: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Copepoda. Developments in Hydrobiology, 47. Kluwer Academic Publishers: Dordrecht. ISBN 90-6193-654-3. XII, 639 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

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Keywords
    Recruitment; Calanus Leach, 1816 [WoRMS]; Copepoda [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Larval fish; Marine food chain; Copepod; Egg production

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  • Runge, J.A.

Abstract
    It is frequently put forward that variability in fisheries productivity is related to interannual variation in physical processes affecting phytoplankton productivity. Here, alternative views of the role of copepods as an intermediary link in North Atlantic marine food chains are discussed. Following Bainbridge & McKay (1968) and Cushing (1982), a strong link between phytoplankton and fisheries variability is proposed for some fish stocks, like cod and redfish, that spawn in spring in regions where Calanus finmarchicus dominates the plankton. Otherwise, in regions where small copepods and other micro- zooplankton dominate the prey field productivity for larval fish, a weak link is proposed. Experimental studies, including laboratory observations of copepod reproductive response to food concentration and incubation techniques for measuring in situ reproductive rates, are important for understanding how copepod dynamics may filter year-to-year differences in phytoplankton production cycles.

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