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An oceanography conservation view of Central America: Caribbean wealth, Pacific wilderness, plunder and mismanagement meets seafloor mining, deep-sea drilling, climate change, and human population explosion in the EEZs and beyond
Huettmann, F. (2015). An oceanography conservation view of Central America: Caribbean wealth, Pacific wilderness, plunder and mismanagement meets seafloor mining, deep-sea drilling, climate change, and human population explosion in the EEZs and beyond, in: Huettmann, F. (Ed.) Central American biodiversity. Conservation, ecology, and a sustainable future. pp. 135-158. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-1-4939-2208-6_5
In: Huettmann, F. (Ed.) (2015). Central American biodiversity. Conservation, ecology, and a sustainable future. Springer New York: New York. ISBN 978-1-4939-2207-9. xxviii, 805 pp., more

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Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    Deep Sea sea floor overcommitted ecosystems minerals rare earths

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  • Huettmann, F.

Abstract
    Two thirds of the world are covered with salt water (Dietrich et al. 1993; Thurman 1994), and of the remaining one third (i.e., land), wetlands, snow, and ice play a large role (Miller and Spoolman 2011). If water is absent this can create a vast desert, accompanied with areas often devoid of life. And as emphasized by the above authors, atmospheric processes play a large role due to water and vapor. Our globe, therefore, should not be called “Earth” but rather “Water.” (“How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean.”—Sir Arthur C. Clarke, English writer.) It is not so surprising then that the human body consists of c. 60?% of water too. Water is simply an inherent part of our system, and of the evolution of life. This is seen explicitly in Central America, in the land- and seascapes and its atmosphere. It is all deeply connected through water cycles. Water troubles are human troubles, and beyond.

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