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Spatiotemporal variability in recruitment around Iriomote Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan: implications for dispersal of spawning corals
Nakamura, M.; Sakai, K. (2010). Spatiotemporal variability in recruitment around Iriomote Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan: implications for dispersal of spawning corals. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 157(4): 801-810. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-009-1363-2
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Nakamura, M.
  • Sakai, K.

Abstract
    Spatiotemporal recruitment patterns of scleractinian corals were investigated around Iriomote Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, in relation to adult coral cover in 2005 and 2006. Although almost all corals were broadcasting spawners, the relationship between recruitment and adult coral cover differed among coral families (Acroporidae, Poritidae, and Pocilloporidae), likely due to differences in embryonic development time. For spawning pocilloporid corals, whose larvae develop relatively more rapidly, recruitment was higher at sites where adult coral cover was higher. In contrast, recruitment was not related to adult coral cover in acroporid and poritid corals, whose embryonic development times were relatively slow. Moreover, recruitment of acroporid corals varied between years, and recruitment was greater at leeward compared to windward reefs for a few days after spawning. These results suggest that embryonic development time and wind-driven surface currents affect larval dispersal and subsequent recruitment patterns at a local scale. Based on embryonic development time, some spawning corals are more likely to have higher rates of self-seeding than others. Our results predict that among spawning corals, local populations of acroporid and poritid corals, whose larvae potentially disperse over long distances and recruit in neighboring reefs, are more resilient to local disturbances than those of pocilloporid corals, whose recruitment relies upon local stock.

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