IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Large scale distribution of acoustical scattering layers at the Norwegian continental shelf and the eastern Norwegian Sea
Torgerson, Th.; Kaartvedt, S.; Melle, W.; Knutsen, T. (1997). Large scale distribution of acoustical scattering layers at the Norwegian continental shelf and the eastern Norwegian Sea. Sarsia 82: 87-96
In: Sarsia. University of Bergen. Universitetsforlaget: Bergen. ISSN 0036-4827, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Torgerson, Th.
  • Kaartvedt, S.
  • Melle, W.
  • Knutsen, T.

Abstract
    Vertical and horizontal distributions of fish and micronekton were mapped in a zigzag pattern from Lofoten, northern Norway to Stadt, southwestern Norway, in March 1992. Pearlsides (Maurolicus muelleri) were present whenever depth was sufficient for daytime requirements (i.e. > 150-200 m). They performed diel vertical migrations, characterized by ascent at dusk, followed by nocturnal descent, and a dawn ascent before downward migration to day depth. Nocturnal descent among pearlside has previously been explained by preference for warm water to speed up digestion, but this could not explain the results in this study as relevant vertical temperature gradients were minor. A deep scattering layer consisting of mesopelagic fish, pelagic shrimps and other macroplankton was present outside the shelf. This layer was located beneath ca 300 m by day, while the tendency to carry out diel vertical migrations varied strongly between water masses. Blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) associated with the layer by day consistently swam into upper waters by night. Dense concentrations of blue whiting at the shelf break, however, remained near the bottom both day and night. Herring (Clupea harengus) were confined to the shelf, staying near the bottom by day and ascending into upper waters by night. Norway pout (Trisopterus esmarkii) lived near the bottom by day, while degree of diel vertical migration appeared to differ among locations.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors