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Physical control of plankton population abundance and dynamics in intertidal rock pools
Johnson, M.P. (2000). Physical control of plankton population abundance and dynamics in intertidal rock pools, in: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) Island, Ocean and Deep-Sea Biology: Proceedings of the 34th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Ponta Delgada (Azores), Portugal, 13-17 September 1999. Developments in Hydrobiology, 152: pp. 145-152
In: Jones, M.B. et al. (Ed.) (2000). Island, Ocean and Deep-Sea Biology: Proceedings of the 34th European Marine Biology Symposium, held in Ponta Delgada (Azores), Portugal, 13-17 September 1999. Reprinted from Hydrobiologia, 440(1-3). Developments in Hydrobiology, 152. Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht. ISBN 0-7923-6846-0. XII, 391 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

Also published as
  • Johnson, M.P. (2000). Physical control of plankton population abundance and dynamics in intertidal rock pools. Hydrobiologia 440(1-3): 145-152, more

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    VLIZ: Proceedings [66235]

Keywords
    Intertidal environment; Models; Neap tides; Plankton; Rocky shores; Tidal cycles; Marine

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  • Johnson, M.P., more

Abstract
    Little is known about the population structure and dynamics of plankton of intertidal rock pools. A numerical model was developed for rock pool plankton with growth limited by both tidal washout and the stress associated with adverse conditions in high-shore pools. This model predicts that a stress tolerant species will tend to have maximum population densities in high-shore pools and that populations will fluctuate in opposite phase to the spring-neap tidal cycle. Conversely, where a species is susceptible to stress in high-shore pools, the maximum population density is likely to occur lower on the shore, and numbers in upper shore pools will cycle in phase with the spring-neap cycle. These two alternative predictions were sufficient to classify the dynamics of the most abundant species in time series taken from rock pools in the Isle of Man. The dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina followed the predictions of the stress tolerant model. In comparison, the spatiotemporal patterns of other taxa, including a ciliate, a dinoflagellate and cryptophytes, suggested stress-susceptible life histories.

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