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Seasonal patterns of biomass variation of Ruppia cirrhosa (Petagna) Grande and Potamogeton pectinatus L. in a coastal lagoon
Menéndez, M.; Comín, F.A. (1989). Seasonal patterns of biomass variation of Ruppia cirrhosa (Petagna) Grande and Potamogeton pectinatus L. in a coastal lagoon, in: Ros, J.D. (Ed.) Topics in Marine Biology: Proceedings of the 22nd European Marine Biology Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, August 1987. Scientia Marina (Barcelona), 53(2-3): pp. 633-638
In: Ros, J.D. (Ed.) (1989). Topics in Marine Biology: Proceedings of the 22nd European Marine Biology Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, August 1987. Scientia Marina (Barcelona), 53(2-3). Instituto de Ciencias del Mar: Barcelona. 145-754 pp., more
In: Scientia Marina (Barcelona). Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. Institut de Ciènces del Mar: Barcelona. ISSN 0214-8358; e-ISSN 1886-8134, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine/Coastal

Authors  Top 
  • Menéndez, M.
  • Comín, F.A.

Abstract
    Coastal lagoons where salinity varies within a wide range during the year are colonized by euryhaline macrophytes which can develop extensive beds. Seasonal changes in biomass of Ruppia cirrhosa and Potamogeton pectinatus were studied in Tancada Lagoon (Ebro Delta, NE Spain) in order to reveal the environmental factors controlling their population development. Ruppia cirrhosa occupy a larger area of the lagoon than Potamogeton pectinatus. Their maximum above ground biomasses are also different (495 g m-2 and 351 g m-2 ash free dry weight, respectively). Below ground biomass of Ruppia cirrhosa is between 9 and 53% of the above ground biomass, while it is 3-40% for Potamogeton pectinatus. Chlorophyll a contents show fluctuations similar to biomass. Low salinity and high turbidity caused by freshwater inflows favour Potamogeton expansion, while Ruppia development is favoured by high salinity and transparent water.

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