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(n-3) HUFA composition of freshly spawned eggs from European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), seabream (Sparus aurata) and red seabream (Pagrus major) collected in different hatcheries
Komis, A.; Léger, P.; Sorgeloos, P. (1991). (n-3) HUFA composition of freshly spawned eggs from European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), seabream (Sparus aurata) and red seabream (Pagrus major) collected in different hatcheries, in: Lavens, P. et al. (Ed.) Larvi '91. Short communications and abstracts of contributions presented at the international Symposium on Fish and Crustacean Larviculture. Gent, Belgium, August 27-30, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 15: pp. 223-224
In: Lavens, P. et al. (Ed.) (1991). Larvi '91. Short communications and abstracts of contributions presented at the international Symposium on Fish and Crustacean Larviculture. Gent, Belgium, August 27-30, 1991. EAS Special Publication, 15. European Aquaculture Society: Gent. ISBN 90-71625-09-5. 427 pp., more
In: EAS Special Publication. European Aquaculture Society, more

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Keywords
    Acids > Organic compounds > Organic acids > Fatty acids
    Aquaculture facilities > Hatcheries
    Breeding > Induced breeding
    Cells > Sexual cells > Eggs > Fish eggs
    Comparative studies
    Cultures > Fish culture
    Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Pagrus major (Temminck & Schlegel, 1843) [WoRMS]; Sparus aurata Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Komis, A.
  • Léger, P.
  • Sorgeloos, P., more

Abstract
    The biochemical composition of fish eggs is often used as an indicator for assessing the nutritional requirements of aquaculture species during their larval stages. Fatty acids of the (n-3) HUFA type have proven to play a critical role in providing good growth, survival and stress resistance in marine fish larvae. Hence, analyzing these fatty acids in fish eggs may provide interesting data on the requirements for those essential nutrients. By comparing the analyses of wild versus broodstock fish eggs differences may appear, possibly explaining differences in egg quality. Intra-spawning-season differences may further appear by following fatty acid profiles in the course of time. Finally, the influence of broodstock nutritionon egg composition may be another variable to consider in the evaluation of the above. In this study freshly released eggs of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), seabream (Sparus aurata), and red seabream (Pagrus major) were collected from broodstock fish held under different conditions in various hatcheries. Temporal variations in fatty acid profiles were monitored by following a seabream broodstock during 1 month. The effect of feedig broodstock with fish-oil coated pellets on the fatty acid profiles of the eggs produced, was established for seabream. The results indicate that for the three species the content of 22:6n-3 is considerably higher than 20:5n-3. Total (n-3) HUFA on dry weight basis appears highest in seabass while on a relative basis (% of total fatty acids) the highest levels are found in seabream eggs and the lowest in red seabream. Differences between seabass eggs from females caught in the wild and naturally spawned broodstock fish kept in captivity, occur particularly in the lower content (half) of 22:6n-3 in the wild eggs. Differenes within the same species cultured at different locations and hence under different conditions are insignificant. The variability is in the range of 2.9 to 9.3% for the relative values and 8.6 to 18.9% for the absolute figures.

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