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Production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) enriched loin and dry cured ham from pigs fed algae: nutritional and sensory quality
Vossen, E.; Raes, K.; Van Mullem, D.; De Smet, S. (2017). Production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) enriched loin and dry cured ham from pigs fed algae: nutritional and sensory quality. European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology 119(5): 13. https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejlt.201600144
In: European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology. Wiley-Blackwell: Hoboken. ISSN 1438-7697; e-ISSN 1438-9312, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Author keywords
    Algae; Omega-3 fatty acids; Oxidation; Pig meat; Volatile compounds

Authors  Top 
  • Vossen, E., more
  • Raes, K., more
  • Van Mullem, D.
  • De Smet, S., more

Abstract
    Dry cured hams and loins enriched with the long-chain n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were produced using three doses of algae in the diet of pigs: 0.3, 0.6, or 1.2g algae/100g feed. Two control treatments were included: A diet containing soybean oil and a linseed oil diet high in alpha-linolenic acid. Loins from the algae treatments contained 10-20mg of DHA/100g and the dry cured hams 25-56mg DHA/100g, which was significantly higher compared to the linseed oil treatment (4.3mg DHA/100g loin and 9.1mg DHA/100g dry cured ham) and the soybean oil treatment (2.4mg DHA/100g loin and 4.5mg DHA/100g dry cured ham). No significant differences were found among treatments for the consumer sensory analysis of the dry cured hams. The volatile compound 2-penten-1-ol was 2.7-fold higher in dry cured hams from the animals fed 1.2g/100g algae compared to the soybean oil treatment and 1.5-fold higher compared to the linseed oil treatment. The dry cured hams from all algae treatments had about 1.2-fold higher TBARS values (lipid oxidation) compared to the control treatments. The color stability and instrumental texture parameters were affected by the algae treatments, while the color and lipid stability of the loins were not affected. Practical applications: The positive health effects of C20:5n-3 (EPA) and C22:6n-3 (DHA) are generally recognized and appear to be greater than for their precursor C18:3n-3. Incorporation of ingredients rich in long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC PUFA) in livestock feeds results in the accumulation of these fatty acids in the intramuscular and subcutaneous fat of the animals and in the derived meat products. Present knowledge of the nutritional and sensory quality of pork products enriched with EPA and DHA from algae is of importance when commercialising entire carcasses of pigs fed an n-3 LC PUFA enriched feed, as the major part of a pig carcass is processed into various meat products. Dry cured hams and loins enriched with the long-chain n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were produced using three doses of algae in the diet of pigs: 0.3, 0.6, or 1.2g algae/100g feed (respectively, ALG0.3, ALG0.6, and ALG1.2). Two control treatments were included: a diet containing soybean oil (SOY) and a linseed oil diet high in alpha-linolenic acid (LIN).

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