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Recent sediment accumulation, organic carbon burial and transport in the northeastern North Sea
de Haas, H.; van Weering, T.C.E. (1997). Recent sediment accumulation, organic carbon burial and transport in the northeastern North Sea. Mar. Geol. 136(3-4): 173-187. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0025-3227(96)00072-2
In: Marine Geology. Elsevier: Amsterdam. ISSN 0025-3227; e-ISSN 1872-6151, more
Related to:
de Haas, H.; van Weering, T.C.E. (1997). Recent sediment accumulation, organic carbon burial and transport in the northeastern North Sea, in: de Haas, H. Transport, preservation and accumulation of organic carbon in the North Sea = Transport, preservatie en accumulatie van organische koolstof in de Noordzee. Geologica Ultraiectina, 155: pp. 41-62, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Chemical elements > Nonmetals > Atmospheric gases > Nitrogen
    Organic matter > Carbon > Organic carbon
    Sedimentation
    ANE, Norway [Marine Regions]
    Marine/Coastal

Authors  Top 
  • de Haas, H.
  • van Weering, T.C.E., more

Abstract
    Organic carbon and nitrogen and sedimentation rate determinations were made of boxcores from the Norwegian Channel, North Sea. The geographical distribution of recent sedimentation areas were defined by analysis of published data and 3.5 kHz penetrating echo sounder data. The annual dry bulk sediment accumulation in the northeastern North Sea is established at 74 × 106 tons. As the average organic carbon content for the Norwegian Channel and Skagerrak/Kattegat sediments is 0.6 and 1.8%, respectively, the organic carbon accumulation rate in the northeastern North Sea could be calculated. The total organic carbon accumulation in the Norwegian Channel and Skagerrak/northern Kattegat is 0.17 × 106 tons · yr−1 and 0.83 × 106 tons · yr−1, respectively. Less than 10% of this is accounted for by local primary production. This means that more than 90% of the organic carbon buried in the sediments of the northeastern North Sea must have been supplied from different sources. Terrigenous sources supply 20% of the organic carbon. The remainder is marine organic matter produced elsewhere in the North Sea, or imported from the Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian Sea and the Baltic Sea. Storm wave and -current induced (near) bottom nepheloid layers are the main likely mechanism to transport fine grained sediments and associated organic matter from the North Sea plateau into the Kattegat, Skagerrak and Norwegian Channel.

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