IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Print this page

Animal size and sea water temperature, but not pH, influence a repeatable startle response behaviour in a wide-ranging marine mollusc
Clements, J.C.; Ramesh, K.; Nysveen, J.; Dupont, S.; Jutfelt, F. (2021). Animal size and sea water temperature, but not pH, influence a repeatable startle response behaviour in a wide-ranging marine mollusc. Anim. Behav. 173: 191-205. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2020.12.008
In: Animal Behaviour. Academic Press: London,. ISSN 0003-3472; e-ISSN 1095-8282, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Author keywords
    antipredator response, carbon dioxide, environmental stress, global change biology, ocean acidification, ocean warming

Authors  Top 
  • Clements, J.C.
  • Ramesh, K.
  • Nysveen, J.
  • Dupont, S., more
  • Jutfelt, F.

Abstract
    Startle response behaviours are important in predator avoidance and escape for a wide array of animals. For many marine invertebrates, however, startle response behaviours are understudied, and the effects of global change stressors on these responses are unknown. We exposed two size classes of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis × trossulus) to different combinations of temperature (15 and 19 °C) and pH (8.2 and 7.5 pHT) for 3 months and subsequently measured individual time to open following a tactile predator cue (i.e. startle response time) over a series of four consecutive trials. Time to open was highly repeatable in the short term and decreased linearly across the four trials. Individuals from the larger size class had a shorter time to open than their smaller-sized counterparts. High temperature increased time to open compared to low temperature, while pH had no effect. These results suggest that bivalve time to open is repeatable, related to relative vulnerability to predation and affected by temperature. Given that increased closure times impact feeding and respiration, the effect of temperature on closure duration may play a role in the sensitivity to ocean warming in this species and contribute to ecosystem level effects.

All data in the Integrated Marine Information System (IMIS) is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors