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Variation in abundances of intertidal populations: consequences of extremities of environment
Underwood, A.J.; Chapman, M.G. (2000). Variation in abundances of intertidal populations: consequences of extremities of environment, in: Liebezeit, G. et al. Life at Interfaces and Under Extreme Conditions: Proceedings of the 33rd European Marine Biology Symposium, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, 7-11 September 1998. Developments in Hydrobiology, 151: pp. 25-36. https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-4148-2_2
In: Liebezeit, G.; Dittmann, S.; Kröncke, I. (Ed.) (2000). Life at Interfaces and Under Extreme Conditions: Proceedings of the 33rd European Marine Biology Symposium, Wilhelmshaven, Germany, 7-11 September 1998. Developments in Hydrobiology, 151. Springer Science+Business Media: Dordrecht. ISBN 978-0-7923-6468-9; e-ISBN 978-94-011-4148-2. VII, 210 pp. https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-4148-2, more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more
Related to:
Underwood, A.J.; Chapman, M.G. (2000). Variation in abundances of intertidal populations: consequences of extremities of environment. Hydrobiologia 426: 25-36. https://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1003995218016, more

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Barnacles
    Barnacles
    Environments > Aquatic environment > Marine environment > Intertidal environment
    Extreme values
    Population characteristics > Population number
    Spatial variations
    Temporal variations
    Topographic features > Landforms > Coastal landforms > Rocky shores
    Marine/Coastal

Authors  Top 
  • Underwood, A.J.
  • Chapman, M.G.

Abstract
    Spatial and temporal variability in patterns and processes are poorly understood for most assemblages, including intertidal assemblages on rocky shores. Such habitats represent gradients of increasing physical harshness towards the top of the shore. Influences of environmental harshness on numbers and recruitment of animals lead to the hypotheses that there should be greater small-scale spatial variance in more extreme parts of the environment (higher on the shore) and greater short-term temporal variance in less extreme (lower) parts of the shore. These predictions were tested using two barnacles (Tesseropora rosea and Chamaesipho tasmanica) and two limpets (Patelloida latistrigata and Notoacmea petterdi) in up to five locations on wave-exposed rocky shores in New South Wales (Australia). Only T. rosea showed different spatial variation at higher and lower levels - but greater at lower than higher levels, contradicting the hypothesis. T. rosea and P. latistrigata had greater temporal variation at lower levels, supporting the hypothesis. C. tasmanica, however, showed the opposite pattern, contradicting the hypothesis. Despite close associations between T. rosea and P. latistrigata, patterns of relationship of spatial variances were inconsistent. The study demonstrates the need for tests in numerous sites and that ecological patterns can differ markedly even for closely related species. It also demonstrates that much more widespread sampling and experimentation are needed to retain predictive and explanatory understanding of environmental gradients.

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