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The relationship between geographic range extent, sea surface temperature and adult traits in coastal temperate fishes
Goodman, M.C.; Hannah, S.M.; Ruttenberg, B.I. (2019). The relationship between geographic range extent, sea surface temperature and adult traits in coastal temperate fishes. J. Biogeogr. 47(7): 1438-1450. https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13595
In: Journal of Biogeography. Wiley-Blackwell: Oxford. ISSN 0305-0270; e-ISSN 1365-2699, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine/Coastal

Authors  Top 
  • Goodman, M.C.
  • Hannah, S.M.
  • Ruttenberg, B.I.

Abstract
    Aim

    We use publicly available data to assess the influence of ocean basin, various biological traits and sea surface temperature on biogeographic range extent for temperate, continental shelf fish species spanning 141 families.

    Location

    Coastal waters of the temperate Northern Hemisphere.

    Taxon

    Teleost Fishes (Infraclass Teleostei).

    Methods

    We assess the relationship between species range extent and depth range, maximum body length, schooling behaviour and use of multiple habitats for 1,251 species of northern, temperate, continental shelf fishes in different basins (Atlantic vs. Pacific) and margins (east vs. west) using linear mixed‐effect models with family and genus as nested random effects. We further assess the relationship between species range endpoint distribution and latitudinal temperature gradient using generalized linear models.

    Results

    We found strong positive relationships between the number of species northern range endpoints and the steepness of the latitudinal sea surface temperature gradient on the western margins of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, but no relationship on the eastern margins of these ocean basins. The strongest predictors of range extent in our global model are ocean basin/margin and depth range. Maximum body length, schooling behaviour and use of multiple habitats are also significant predictors of range extent in the global model. The factors influencing range extent differ by basin and margin.

    Main conclusions

    There are broad differences in patterns of species range extent and distribution of species ranges among basins/margins. These differences appear to be driven in part by variation in latitudinal water temperature gradient between basin margins. Our data suggest that sharp latitudinal temperature gradients may pose a barrier to dispersal and range expansion along the western margins of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, but not necessarily on the eastern margins. Our work also suggests that several post‐settlement traits may be associated with range extent either globally or in some temperate basins.


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