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Geographical distance and large rivers shape genetic structure of Avicennia officinalis in the highly dynamic Sundarbans mangrove forest and Ganges Delta region
Triest, L.; Hasan, S.; Mitro, P.R.; De Ryck, D.J.R.; Van der Stocken, T. (2018). Geographical distance and large rivers shape genetic structure of Avicennia officinalis in the highly dynamic Sundarbans mangrove forest and Ganges Delta region. Est. Coast. 41(3): 908-920. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12237-017-0309-z
In: Estuaries and Coasts. Estuarine Research Federation: Port Republic, Md.. ISSN 1559-2723; e-ISSN 1559-2731, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
Author keywords
    Mangrove; Avicennia; Microsatellites; Genetic structure; Dispersal;Conservation

Authors  Top 
  • De Ryck, D.J.R., more
  • Van der Stocken, T., more

Abstract
    The Ganges Delta and Sundarbans comprise the largest continuous mangrove area in the world. These mangroves are subjected to high riverine and tidal dynamics, and the coastline irregularity is characterized by many north-to-south oriented rivers that may hamper dispersal of mangrove propagules. Whereas connectivity levels and resulting population genetic structure often can be explained by ocean currents, other factors may control estuarine-scale mangrove genetic patterns and limit gene flow even between sites in close geographic proximity. We investigated whether the complex estuarine coastline in the Ganges Delta and Sundarbans shaped the genetic structure of Avicennia officinalis populations across regions and rivers at various distances (ca. 1 to 265 km). Using nine microsatellite loci, 433 individuals from 14 populations revealed predominant outcrossing and a high level of genetic variation when compared to other Avicennia species. A moderate but significant level of differentiation was detected among populations (F ST = 0.09), and a principal coordinate analysis clearly separated populations of the Chittagong coastline from the Sundarbans. An individual-based Bayesian analysis also indicated those two gene pools. Genetic distances across the whole region could best be explained by cumulative river width and geographical distance separating the populations. Within the Sundarban region, the low genetic differentiation of A. officinalis populations indicated a continuous distribution model with a smooth isolation-by-distance that gradually increased across large rivers shaping the genetic structure of A. officinalis in the Ganges Delta. These findings indicated that in addition to geographical distance, rivers might act as physical barriers, affect gene flow and shape genetic connectivity. This and detailed population genetic information should be incorporated into the ongoing afforestation or restoration strategies in and outside of the Sundarbans mangrove forest.

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